Covenant Health is an innovative, Catholic regional delivery network and a leader in values based, not-for-profit health and elder care. We sponsor hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living residences and other health and elder care organizations throughout New England.
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What is the difference between a not-for-profit and a for profit health care facility?

Answer:
From Wikipedia

"Whereas profit-making corporations exist under the premise of earning and distributing taxable business earnings to shareholders, the non-profit organization exists primarily to provide programs and services that are of benefit to others and might not be otherwise provided by local, state, or federal entities. While they are able to earn a profit, more accurately called a surplus, such earnings are retained by the organization for its future provision of programs and services, and are not owned by nor distributed to individuals or stake-holders."

 

Covenant Health does not have a facility in my area. How can I find another Catholic facility near me?

Answer:
The Catholic Health Association lists all the Catholic health care facilities in the United States. Please go to chausa.org for a list of Catholic health care facilities by state.

What makes a facility Catholic?

Answer:
The critical criterion of a Catholic facility is its operation in accordance with the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services issued by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. The directives were first published by the American bishops in 1981 to provide guidance against the background of the growing clinical power of contemporary health care. They have been revised several times since to keep them abreast of changes in health care and its delivery.

The directives are based on the church's teachings on the meaning of death and suffering and on centuries of reflection on the application of natural law to the specific circumstances of health care. They are grounded in the special care that Jesus Christ displayed for the sick and dying. This provides Catholic health care institutions, health care professionals, and lay people caring for others' health care needs with a special standing in the church. They are doing, on behalf of all of us, the healing work of Christ.

The directives also embody Catholic social teaching. Catholic hospitals should be institutions that care for the least well-off in society — the poor and the marginalized. They should be places where mutual respect prevails and where employees are treated fairly. And Catholic hospitals must be responsible stewards of their resources.

Pastoral care should be a distinctive mark of a Catholic hospital. There should be easy and regular access to prayer and the sacraments.